Random thoughts about M

I am working on the table of contents for my new book on designing software with SQL Server Modeling, or TheModelingSystemFormerlyKnownAsOslo.  There is a lot to be shared, but TOCs are kinda boring.  I thought I would use a post to fill out any random thoughts.

I think I am going to break the book into three parts.  First, some Microsoft-centric bits about modeling in general.  Second, a detailed look at M.  Finally, we are gonna build an app.  I want to make this thing functional.  If I can't build real, usable software with it and make my life easier, then I don't want it, and I don't want you to use it.  Proves how much I think of the SQL Modeling team if I am writing a book on it, huh?

Anyway.  The tl;dr on M is that is eats examples and poops your database AND your POCOs.  If they eventually get to the point where complex examples are handles gracefully, then we might have something here.

I am still not sold on Quadrant.  They need to stop showing SQL Server table level examples.  That's.  Not.  The.  Point.  If I can't gain visibility into my AD and my file structure and my partner's accounting system, I'll just use Crystal Reports or Query Analyzer.

Most people don't understand that we have been given unprecedented access into a technology that probably won't be ready for prime time for a couple of years.  M is rough.  Quadrant is rough.  There is a lot of SCOPE work to do, not to mention a little coding.  This concept is just starting to find itself.  There are technologies that SSM depends on that haven't been built yet.  Have a little patience, people.

Now, this  Linq to M idea is a very interesting look into the thinking of the SSM team. We describe something in M.  We upload to the repository.  We can 'query' the example in C# with Linq.  Great.  Are we ever going to use M to move REAL data, rather than example data?  No?  Then how is this different from Linq to SQL?  It isn't?  Oh, OK.

Generally, though, this is something I have been saying since my "Web Design With The End in Mind" article back in 1999.  The data is the application.  If you understand the behavior of the data - which you somehow must store and business rules (or metadata) then your application is done. Skin it and go get a beer.

Wow, Shawn Wildermuth's article on Textual DSLs is really good.  Why haven't I seen this?  I thought he was just a UI geek.  Color me impressed.

Sorry this is so stream-of-consciousness.  It is late and this cough is keeping me from sleeping.

I think that SQL Server Modeling has the potential to dramatically change how Microsoft architects design software for clients.  I think it has the potential to improve design too, by making good, principled design part of the fabric rather than a documented rule.  I really, really wish they hadn't pinned it to SQL Server, but I guess I get it.  The data is the application.  Tha'ts why I have called it the Data Driven Web for fifteen years.


 

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Bill Sempf

Husband. Father. Pentester. Secure software composer. Brewer. Lockpicker. Ninja. Insurrectionist. Lumberjack. All words that have been used to describe me recently. I help people write more secure software.

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